SeKisha B.: Healing with hula hoops

SeKisha_BSeKisha B.
41, Washington, D.C.

 

Most hated stereotype: All stereotypes bother me because none of them are true to define ALL in a group.

 

When you see SeKisha B. walking down the street, don’t take her lack of a smile as a hint to her personality.

“Most of the time I’m in deep thought about my next move,” said the entreprenuer. “But if someone gets my attention, I typically greet them with a hello and a smile. Once we have a conversation, they have a totally different opinion of me.”

Angry black woman she is not, though that’s the stereotype applied to her most.

There’s no mistaking her bubbly personality when you see her at work. The well being of others is a passion of the D.C. native and a goal of her fledgling business.

Last year, SeKisha created Heal’n Hoop, water-weighted hula-hoops. She doesn’t only make them, but also volunteers in the community, teaching adults how to use the childhood toy for fitness. In parks, shelters and recreation centers around the city, SeKisha can be found surrounded by residents twirling their hips, keeping the hoop from hitting the ground.

Whether it’s the hoop, her words of motivation for her friends and community, SeKisha aims to help when she can.

“I want everyone to have a happy and fulfilling life,” she said. “It hurts to see pain, fear and distrust in the eyes of others.”

Other than her full-time job as a customer service manager, SeKisha operates hArt to Heel Creations, which features her paintings and Heel to Heal, a nonprofit mentoring program.

“I want to be remembered as a selfless person that loved her daughter and shoes,” said the single mother, who is very rarely spotted in flats. “I just get people. I understand them and their issues and I see beyond the surface to help them in any way I can.”

 

Spilled Ink

Describe a story about a time/event in your life that you believe most defines you:

When I was 11th grade I went to live with my Granny because my mom experienced some hardships. She didn’t tell me; I saw them happening and I removed myself. That was the day that I vowed not to take on others’ problems and not wallow in my own. If I can do something about it, I will; if not I will make the best of it or remove myself. That incident defined how I deal with people. I get to say I don’t want to be apart of this. It’s a great quality to have but it can also be hurtful to others because I have no problem with removing myself from a situation. I have never left without first trying to work it out – I don’t have any regrets that I could have done more.

Describe the proudest moment of your life:

Proudest moment was seeing my daughter graduate high school. Hearing all of the wonderful things about her from others made me very proud. She was the class President, among the top 10 in her class and she was the only person to receive the Principal’s Leadership Award. I don’t usually mention the fact that I’ve been a single mom for 19 years; but in that moment, it was all about my dedication and sacrifice as a mother. I DID IT!! WE DID IT!! The second one is being able to start all of my businesses with the help of my daughter. She has been instrumental in many things. She’s my motivation and muse.

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